Tracking Down Early Members

As has been widely advertised, 2018 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of BFC. The committee has been planning a series of events to mark this, and one of these is a party for current BFC members, plus as many early members as we can find. As my wife Marilyn is one of only two remaining founder members, and because she is very good at organising events like this, she and I were given the job of tracking down and inviting as many early members as we could locate.

This turned out to be quite a complex piece of detective work.  When the Chorus was founded to perform a specific piece of work (Belshazzar’s Feast) at the 1968 Brighton Festival, few people expected it to still be going strong fifty years later, so virtually no records were kept. We had a copy of the first programme for that concert, which listed the singers, but it only gave surname and initials, i.e. J. Smith, D. Brown, etc. We then had to contact any early members we are still in touch with to try to add any further information they could remember – ideally including contact details.

Some of the people we were then able to contact put us in touch with others they could remember, and so we managed to build up a partial picture. Sadly, we discovered that quite a few of the early members have died. Although we still don’t know the identity of many of those early pioneers, we should be able to invite enough of them to have a decent party later this year!

Steve Linehan, Bass 1

 

Posted on 19th February 2018

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Sunrise

Word painting abounds in two of the pieces that featured in BFC’s summer concert, ‘Sunrise’, reflects Alto 2, Susanne Hoebel.

Summer! What better way to spend a summer′s evening than to go to a concert of summery music. This time the Brighton Festival Chorus and the Brighton Festival Youth Choir will perform at the Attenborough Centre for the Creative Arts, University of Sussex, a new venue for us and by all accounts a very pleasant one.

Is there another composer whose music so vividly conjures up the English countryside and the atmosphere in open natural surroundings as Vaughan Williams? On hearing a piece by him I feel instantly transported to ″green and pleasant lands″. Learning An Oxford Elegy has proved more of a challenge than it first appeared. The text makes use of poems by the Victorian poet Matthew Arnold, and rather than the choir singing all the words, there is a narrator to read them. Every now and again there is a ″Safety pause″, where the choir stops – at a stile or a garden gate – thus allowing the narrator to catch up, as he is reading his words and ″hastening along with eager steps″. It is a beautiful and – as the name suggests – elegiac piece.

The Sunrise Mass by Ola Gjeilo also paints sound pictures, with the long, drawn-out notes of the Kyrie making the rising of the morning sun an audial experience. And as with watching a real sunrise where you can never be sure of catching the exact moment when the sun finally, finally pops over the line of the horizon or the mountain ridge or the crest of a hill, here the music is suddenly complete and ends in a long Amen as the landscape fills with sunlight.

What the Youth Choir has prepared – Letters to Lindbergh by Richard Rodney Bennett – I haven′t heard yet, but judging by past samples of their singing, the last one being their presentation to us, the members of BFC, a couple of weeks ago, it is bound to be good.

Then the summer break. No singing. Oh – except for the re-auditions, of course!

Susanne Hoebel. Alto 2

BFC performed Vaughan Williams, ‘An Oxford Elegy’ and Ola Gjeilo, ‘Sunrise Mass’ with Chamber Domaine for their 2017 summer concert in the Attenborough Centre on the University of Sussex campus on Saturday 8 July.

 

Posted on 8th July 2017

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Adams vs Ravel

Harmonium puts Bass 1, Steven Harris, in mind of Ravel’s Bolero.

We are preparing John Adams’s Harmonium for performance in the Brighton Festival. John Adams is a minimalist composer; this does not mean that he is particularly small or of little importance. Minimalist music is characterised by being non-narrative, non-teleological and non-representational or, as we might say, repetitive. However, repetition does not mean boring - quite the contrary, it is by repetition that the drama is built up. Think of Ravel’s Bolero, for example.

Harmonium is wonderful music, but there’s no denying that it’s a challenge to perform. It takes the singers well out of their comfort zones, both figuratively and literally; altos and basses are required to sing well above their normal ranges and to find notes they didn’t know they have.  It has constantly changing rhythms, with syncopations and syncopations within syncopations. It has a lot of repetition, with no comforting landmarks to latch on to, few cues to let you know where you are. And in the absence of such cues each singer has to adopt a strict arithmetical approach, counting every bar religiously so as to avoid missing an entry or giving an involuntary solo. On the other hand, a strict arithmetical approach would squeeze the life out of the piece. It is, as always, a matter of finding the right balance.

Harmonium is a setting of one poem by John Donne and two poems by Emily Dickinson. Their themes are love, sex and death. It starts with the choir singing 152 bars of steady crotchets, mostly but not invariably four to a bar, amounting to about 600 notes. The words put to these notes are repetitions of ‘No, no, no, no’ and ‘ne, ne, ne, ne’, with the occasional ‘never’ thrown in. It would be interesting to know what Donne and Dickinson would make of the settings of their words. Emily Dickinson was of a notably reclusive and self-denying disposition, so she might well have approved of the repetitions of ‘no’, ‘ne’ and ‘never’, though these are from John Donne’s poem. All that ‘no, no, no, no’ calls to mind the refrain to an old music hall ballad: ‘No, no, a thousand times no, you’ll never buy my caress; No, no a thousand times no; I’d rather die than say yes.’ This is a sentiment that Emily Dickinson might have approved of, even if she might not have been comfortable with its expression.

Harmonium is a challenge and we look forward to meeting the challenge. But, we can take comfort from the fact that we are not the side drummer in Ravel’s Bolero, who starts off ‘tum ti-ti-ti tum ti-ti-ti-ti-ti-ti-ti-ti-ti tum’, and repeats this for the next 15 minutes, playing 430 bars and 5,144 drum beats. And woe betide the drummer who gives 5,145 drum beats!

Steven Harris, Bass 1

Posted on 25th May 2017

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Encountering Emily Dickinson

A cinema trip, a concert in aid of Parkinson’s UK and the recent Brighton Festival Youth Choir concert combine to permeate the thoughts of Alto 2, Sarah Earl.

I seem to be having a bit of an Emily Dickinson 'fest' at the moment. It all started with a momentous rendition of ‘No Rack can Torture Me’ – a Dickinson poem that Morgan Pochin set to music as part of their work, Invictus: A Cantata for Liberty which BFC commissioned two years ago and which was revived for the recent concert in aid of Parkinson’s UK at the Royal Albert Hall - together with the release of the film, A Quiet Passion (viewed like quite a few in the choir did, in the very intimate setting of Uckfield Picture House). Now there’s the upcoming performance of Harmonium ‘at the end of the month’. That sounds ever so much better than ’four days’.

All this has prompted me to download the complete works of ED onto my Kindle. I guess a lot of the work was scratched away as she burnt the midnight oil and, due to her quirky approach to punctuation, were quite heavily edited before publication. Apparently she herself published very few of the 1,800 poems that she penned. However, as I plough through, many lines appear to set themselves in my head to the music we which we are now so familiar, and references to Death, Eden and Immortality pop up again and again. Perhaps it’s time for a dance company like Rambert to take up the baton and add their interpretation to the mix – if they haven’t done so already (Oh, I’ve discovered they did: ED’s ‘If I may have it when it’s dead’ featured in their ‘In the Labyrinth of Love’ tour six years ago! Sorry to have missed that).

Then, last Friday, it was the turn of our very wonderful Youth Choir. Juliette admitted having force-fed them with Dickinson as well, and we were treated to a wonderful version of their setting of ‘No Rack’ for higher voices and Laura Farnell’s three-part setting of ‘Heart, we will forget him’. Those clear young voices just rang out in All Saints Church, Hove.

Really excited, but a bit nervous, of course, about Sunday …

Sarah Earl, Alto 2

Posted on 25th May 2017

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On Learning Harmonium

Susanne Hoebel takes us through Harmonium from the perspective of an Alto 2.

Something must be happening between the music and myself, if I wake up in the middle of the night with ″Because I could not stop for death″ singing in my head. No sound, of course, and the off-beat rhythm is perfect. In my head. Feeling pleased with myself I go back to sleep to the sound of ″I never stooped so low″. Rhythm not a problem. Clearly I am ingesting the music, internalising it, absorbing it, perhaps even into my bloodstream.

The moment when the hard slog of learning this piece is turning into the thrill of singing it, has come. I can see now how everything is fitting together, how the repetitiveness of no-no-no-no-no-no and dat-dat-dat-dat-dat-dat is intensifying and crystallizing into the ″I″ of ″I never stooped so low″ which takes off and soars above all else. A mediocre poem? I don′t think so. Then ″My love, though more silly, is more brave″ – with all the off-beats perfectly in place – a description of the speaker′s love ″ex negativo″, having dismissed two other kinds of love, and now the choir asserts this love, affirming it, shouting it out loud, with the orchestra going full pelt.

On to the next section, ″If that be simply perfectest″, where the two women′s sections have to hold their own against each other. No-no-no-no-no, don′t give in to the pull of the rhythm of the other section, stick to your own on-the-beat, off-the-beat, and it will be ″perfectest″ and lead at length to the beautiful whispered end.

So many other things. Such as the beauty in ″Wild Nights″, if the ″ts″ of ″nights″ comes in unison from the entire choir. The thrill of the climax where everything seems to clash, culminating in a tremendous, awe-inspiring noise.

Or the challenge in ″Negative Love″ of the low ″G″ in the alto line that we must hang on to at all cost, despite it grating against everything around and despite also the closeness of the much more comfortable seeming ″F″. Then the ″Rowing″ section in ″Wild Nights″, where again each line has to be defended against the conflicting one, with fingers moving along the bars and a glance to the person next to you confirming that you are still on the same page – the expression resuming its literal meaning for the moment – and then the sopranos rising above the gentle rowing rhythm provided by the altos and singing that beautiful line.

Oh so much! There is so much in ″Harmonium″, so much to enjoy, to learn, to listen out for. So much to go wrong, too – but we mustn′t dwell on that as all will be well!

Susanne Hoebel. Alto 2

Britten Sinfonia rehearsing Harmonium at Henry Wood Hall, London

Posted on 25th May 2017

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Harmonium - Emily Dickinson

Bass 1, Steve Linehan, writes about rehearsing Harmonium, and about two of the poems, by the 19th century American poet Emily Dickinson, that John Adams uses in Harmonium.

I was delighted when, a few months ago, it was announced that we would be performing John Adams’ amazing choral masterpiece, Harmonium.  We have performed it only once before, in the 2009 Brighton Festival, and it was a truly magical experience.  It was also one of the most difficult pieces we had ever rehearsed.  It was so different to our normal repertoire that it took us quite a while to get to grips with its rhythmic complexities and rich harmonic textures.  For example, it starts with the syllable “no no no no no no” repeated for about two minutes.  Sounds boring?  Well, with many composers it probably would be, but John Adams builds it up gradually, adding  layer upon layer of voices in a shimmering, pulsing effect, until it dissolves into the first line of John Donne’s poem Negative Love - “I never stoop’d so low …”.

The second and third movements of Harmonium are set to poems by the 19th century poet Emily Dickinson.  Before Harmonium I knew very little about Emily Dickinson, but I became fascinated by her while rehearsing the work. She lived the later years of her adult life as a virtual recluse – rarely leaving her bedroom in her parents’ home in Amherst, Massachusetts. After her death her younger sister discovered that Emily had written hundreds of poems, and many of them revealed a vivid imagination and a fascination with death.  The second movement of Harmonium sets her poem entitled “Because I could not stop for Death, he kindly stopped for me”, and in it she imagines going for a carriage ride with Death, revisiting the various stages of her life, before pausing in front of her own grave.  John Adams’ setting of this dark poem is suitably eerie and foreboding.  Some friends of mine came to our 2009 performance, and one of them rushed up to me in the bar afterwards and said what an amazing piece of music that was, and that she would want the second movement played at her funeral.  I know what she meant!

The third movement gives us a glimpse of what else may have been going on inside Dickinson’s head. Entitled "Wild Nights - Wild Nights!", the poem describes her sexual fantasies with an imaginary lover. It is laden with 19th century metaphors for passion, such “ah, the sea! Might I but moor tonight in thee”, and the repeated phrase “rowing, and rowing, and rowing”.  Whilst the first few minutes of the movement are certainly exciting and passionate, as singers we approach this section with some trepidation, because it is screamingly high for basses and altos. Such heights of passion cannot last however (in music, at least!), and soon we are in calmer waters, wistfully intoning “were I with thee”.  We finally leave Emily Dickinson rowing across her metaphorical sea, as the music subsides and gradually fades to nothing. Magic!

Steve Linehan, Bass 1

Posted on 21st May 2017

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Learning Harmonium in sectional form

Bass 2, Malcolm Purbrick, ruminates on a car accident and singing the Beach Boys in the shower in the course of learning Harmonium.

1. Prelude - Short Ride in a Fast Machine
(Tuesday, February 14, 2017, 6:35 pm – the evening of the first Harmonium rehearsal).

The “short ride?”  No more than 100 metres south from our house on Ditchling Road, where our car had halted.

It had been rammed in the rear by a fast machine; “well over the speed limit,” according to one of the witnesses.

Requisite details swapped and within 10 minutes, Sue and I set off once more, picked up our friend, and the three of us arrived at Patcham School just in time …

2. Fugue - Surf’s up

I think the motor accident must have disinhibited me.  I’d never sung Harmonium before. but I was certainly giving it a go, and not worrying about (inevitable) errors. 

A good start: but the first rehearsal made me aware that Harmonium was a very different project to memorizing Dream of Gerontius (for the last Brighton Festival). Harmonium would require more singing along with the CD, getting the vibe through extensive repetitions, more getting a feel for subtle landmarks in homogeneous textures; and thankfully, a lot less memorizing and testing efficacy thereof.

Also, I’d been reluctantly sold on the notion that “Repetition is the mother of tuition” since I encountered it in The Art of Piano Playing (Heinrich Neuhaus) last summer.  I found that a greater commitment to that approach did indeed seem to help with my progress on piano.  So, that’s the approach I’m taking with Harmonium.

Harmonium also offers a generous range through which a second bass may sing – just 3 steps short of 3 octaves up from the C# furnished by death when we wouldn’t stop for him. Not a bad deal for a 2nd bass who’s a Beach Boys fan, not averse sometimes to singing Surf’s Up in the shower.  And, of course, you don’t find yourself singing lyrics such as “colonnaded ruins domino …”

The text you encounter in Harmonium is kinder than that.

3. Interlude - The text

(1) Negative Love – John Donne (1572 – 1631);
(2) Because I could not stop for death, and
(3) Wild nights - Emily Dickinson (1830 – 1886).

After we’d sung through most of Harmonium for the first time, I was intrigued by the way the Donne and Dickinson texts sat so easily together, not least because they’d been written ~ 250 years apart.  Then I read Brian Derbyshire’s excellent analysis of Negative Love, which was originally distributed to BFC members for the 2009 performance and re-distributed for the current project. Brian’s analysis identifies how Adams’ setting of Donne’s “somewhat convoluted and abstruse language” successfully facilitates Donne Dickinson duality.  Brian also observes how syllabic repetition generates mantra-like structures from Donne’s text.

So, Harmonium confronts us with soul worms, not ear worms.

Certainly, the two Dickinson texts do have their calm moments. 

And last month, in the brilliant Morgan Pochin setting of No Rack Can Torture Me, we witnessed how an Emily Dickinson text can engage and captivate a packed Albert Hall.

4. Coda - A Day in the Life

In the final month of preparation, there are holes to fill; but the best part is yet to come.

Sitting behind the timpani, waiting for the tutti rehearsal to begin.

Malcolm Purbrick, Bass 2

Posted on 11th May 2017

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John Donne’s Negative Love or The Nothing in Harmonium

Bass 2, Brian Derbyshire, writes about one of the poems, by the metaphysical poet John Donne, that John Adams uses in Harmonium.

Donne’s Love Poems (Songs and Sonnets) are among the best we have. Certainly poems like A Valediction Forbidding Mourning, The Extasie and The Anniversarie are outstanding and will be found in almost all anthologies of great poetry. The range of Donne’s work is astonishing: his poems are sensual, spiritual, clever, witty, tender, humorous, intellectually challenging, emotional, dramatic, intense and deeply religious. The narrative development in intellectual argument can change mood and feeling sometimes within a single stanza.

So I find it puzzling that John Adams chose Donne’s poem, Negative Love as one of the texts for Harmonium. It is, in my view, a mediocre poem; it is hardly surprising that it is almost never anthologised. Several Chorus members have expressed similar bewilderment.

Perhaps Adams’ treatment of it makes its somewhat convoluted and abstruse language irrelevant.  He explodes parts of the poem into repeated syllables, so that they become like rapidly reiterated instrumental sounds, almost as mantras to induce a trance-like experience.  [Adams’ treatment of the two Emily Dickinson poems is more respectful of meaning and calls for little comment or exposition....at least not in front of the children......!]

Donne, however, appears to be affirming that his Love…. [God is Love, we understand, so this might be a statement about God]…. can not be reduced by definition or description.  It is, as it were, beyond the confines of language and beyond the grasp of our emotional and intellectual understanding.  Love does not have as its target the physical (eye ,cheek, lip); nor is it something that our moral or intellectual qualities might aspire to (despite, we might note, what Donne rather frequently affirms elsewhere!). We can only approach Love by stating what it is not, i.e. the Negatives.  The poet is, however, quite at ease with this state of affairs.  Transcendental ignorance (bliss?) protects him from the vulnerability of knowing clearly what Love is, for he fears that, were he fully to comprehend Love, he might be conscious of failure to achieve it.  (The last two lines of each stanza stress this potential failure: he might miss that for which he craves and towards which he might wish to speed).

Brian Derbyshire, Bass 2

Posted on 8th May 2017

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SymFunny No. 2

On 19 April 2017 Brighton Festival Chorus took part in SymFunny No. 2, the second fundraising concert in aid of Parkinson’s UK, in the Royal Albert Hall. Alto 2, Susanne Hoebel, reflects on the experience.

The concert organised by Parkinson′s UK was a resounding success, we sang the ″roof right off the Albert Hall″, as it says in the lyrics of the first song, and both the music and the message – that more be done to find a cure for the disease – floated up into the evening sky and was heard far and wide.

So loud and clear was the call for new drugs and more funding for more research to bring alleviation, if not a cure, to the people suffering from Parkinson′s that scientists in their white coats heard it and were prompted to work feverishly all night in their research laboratories achieving a decisive breakthrough in the early hours which they proudly announced the next morning on the BBC news. That′s how it was, right?

Unlikely. That′s magical thinking. Although exactly such an announcement was made on the morning after the concert. A breakthrough in the research, the prospect of a new drug. A cure just round the corner. Wouldn’t that be fantastic?

It was the second concert. SymFunny No. 2. The first one was in 2014. So why this one? As James said in his speech: ″The first concert was three years ago. Since then nothing has happened. I still have Parkinson′s. There is still no cure.″ (Not verbatim.)

So Parkinson′s UK felt they had to make some more noise. Shake people up. Prod the research institutes. But also raise awareness. Nobody who came to the concert last night and watched the video about Karen could have been in any doubt about what a truly horrible, life-changing, even life-shattering disease Parkinson′s is, and also life-long, whilst there is no cure.

A life-changing disease, also for those who live with people afflicted by Parkinson′s, because it takes so much resilience and inner strength. I am full of admiration for Juliette, and for Juliette and James as a couple, who have decided to take this monster head on and not be defeated by it. And who composed ″No rack can torture me″, based on a poem by Emily Dickinson, to show their resolve. It is a beautiful, beautiful piece, and we sang it proudly in the Royal Albert Hall last night.

I took part at the first concert, I took part last night, and if need be, I will take part again.

Susanne Hoebel, 2nd Alto

Posted on 22nd April 2017

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Recording Elgar's From the Bavarian Highlands

Recently, BFC worked on a new CD of choral works by Elgar with the BBC Concert Orchestra. The CD is due to be released on Somm Records in summer 2017. Soprano 1, Sue Purbrick, writes about the second recording session in Watford Colosseum.

On Tuesday March 21st, Brighton Festival Chorus travelled to the Colosseum in Watford to record the remaining pieces of music for the forthcoming Elgar CD.

For me it was a return to the area I had lived in for 40 years before moving to Brighton early in 2015, and The Colosseum (previously Watford Town Hall) which is the "home venue" of the Watford Philharmonic Orchestra and choir, with whom my husband Malcolm and I sang.

Our village of Bushey, just outside Watford, is twinned with Landsberg in Bavaria. We had visited Landsberg on a musical exchange in 1994 so had some idea of the landscape described in the songs. There was still a good deal of ale quaffing done when we were there.

Our recording started at 2.00pm with "The Marksman" - the longest of the six pieces, and the one requiring the largest orchestra. It was inspiring to hear the full orchestration describing the excitement of the hunting expedition. It was also encouraging to know that a good part of the work was done when Barry Wordsworth was satisfied with the recording.

With a break at 5.00pm for some food and drink, we pressed on with each piece in turn as the orchestra gradually diminished, finishing with a truly heartbreaking rendition of "False Love", completing the recording to the satisfaction of conductor and producer by 9.00pm, when we piled back on to the coaches to come home.

I was exhausted the following day but felt that we had done a really good day's work.

We're all looking forward to hearing the final results.

Sue Purbrick, 1st Soprano

 

Posted on 22nd April 2017

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End of a Busy Year

Alto 2, Susanne Hoebel, reflects on a busy few months and looks forward to 2017 and beyond.

So much has been happening in the Choir lately that it is difficult to know where to start. For a view back into the past year and forward to the future I shall use the vantage point of the Christmas Concert at the Brighton Dome, the last major event, where we performed together with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and the Brighton Festival Youth Choir.

Such was the success of that event that even those with a healthy disdain for Christmas concerts were happy and joyful at the end of it. Not only had we managed to sell all tickets, thus performing to a packed auditorium, but we also had a great old time. I personally love the Sleigh Ride and ″Five gold rings″ from the Twelve Days of Christmas, and in a mixed bunch of goodies there is something for everybody so that with every piece more eyes lit up, more smiles appeared, and by the end of the concert we were all happy. The mood was at once festive and one of good will and good fun. As every year it was ″the best ever″, and so it should be.

With the Youth Choir being positioned between the orchestra and the rest of the chorus, we were behind them for the entire performance, but what an impression they made even with their backs turned! The young people with their hair brushed to a sheen stood straight as rods, held their black folders by their sides as they had been told (because – how impressive is that? – they knew most of the music off by heart!) and followed the conductor perfectly at every turn. And produced a wonderful sound. This is Juliet Pochin′s good work whose rapport with the members of the Youth Choir is visibly, palpably excellent, and they wanted to do her proud. Which they did! They were a joy to behold and listen to!

But Christmas now being over we can look to the future. Which doesn′t look too bleak for the BFC. The next project is the recording of more Elgar. More, because we did some in September, and tough it seemed a daunting project to begin with, it turned out to be good fun yielding excellent results to boot – if Barry Wordsworth, the conductor, is to be believed, and why should we doubt his word?

This is what happened. In late September, on two of the hottest days of the whole summer, two coaches conveyed us to the Colosseum in Watford where the recording was going to take place. When we arrived back safe and sound at the end of the second day I reflected on all the things that could have gone wrong when one hundred people are involved in a co-ordinated project like this: The buses could have been late, got stuck in traffic, broken down on the way. Members of the choir or their wallets could have been left behind at Pease Pottage Service Station. On account of the great heat people might have had fainting fits or been otherwise taken unwell, they could have been morose and short-tempered with exhaustion and dehydration. The same goes for the orchestra. The conductor might have suffered under the heat and literally lost his cool. None of this happened, which is extraordinary and reason to be grateful. And we enjoyed the experience!

Between then and Christmas we performed the Brahms Requiem. In German, which is a challenge. There was excellent language coaching from Heide Hughes and Norbert Meyn. And because of that we did pretty well with the German in rehearsals. Not so easy once on stage, of course, and we slipped back on some of the things we had learnt. The singing went alright, though, didn′t it – or so we thought in the choir. Alright maybe, said our conductor. Scope for improvement, then.

What definitely went well and was a very good idea was the small didactic unit before the performance of the Requiem in which James explained to the audience some of the aspects of Brahms′ extraordinary musical decisions with us illustrating his points by singing short extracts. People gain brief and intelligent insights into the workings of a composition without having to plough through long and wordy theory, which nobody wants. This could become a feature in future concerts, who knows.

In the early part of 2017 we are back at Watford Colosseum with the BBC Concert Orchestra once again recording Elgar, From the Bavarian Highlands, and in March performing in the Royal Albert Hall for a concert in aid of Parkinson’s UK. For the BFC the spring is partly shrouded in mystery because nobody knows or is supposed to know what we are performing when and with whom in the Brighton Festival in May. Two other things are certain at this point in time, however. The first thing is that re-auditioning will start in February. Everybody – perhaps not everybody – is quaking in their boots. Is it really so scary? None of us want to fail, of course not. I shall be devastated if I fail. In the three years I have been in the choir it has become to mean so much to me, more than I can say. I have sung great works that I had never sung before, some even that didn′t know before. What an education! I have made friends. I have sung in the Royal Albert Hall. Three times all told! Of course I want to stay in the choir. So I shall diligently practice the suggested audition pieces. As will everybody else, I have no doubt.

The second thing we know is that we will be performing Britten′s War Requiem. Not this year, it′s a long-term project. Another work I have not sung. Another challenge. I bought the score, I bought the CD. I am looking forward to it!

Susanne Hoebel, 2nd Alto, 02/01/2017

Details of forthcoming concerts appear on these pages as soon as they are known – and keep an eye on our Twitter feed and Facebook page for frequent updates.

 

Posted on 2nd January 2017

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